Facts And Causes Of Drug Addiction Habits

By | August 24, 2017

Drug addiction is a serious mental health illness that is plaguing individuals from all walks of life. Some believe that addictive behaviors are the result of genetic predisposition to become an addict. Others believe that a chaotic upbringing is the root cause. Researchers in the field of psychology agree that it is in fact a combination of the two. A genetic predisposition to addictive behaviors coupled with environmental triggers leads an individual to develop addiction.

Depressants and stimulants are two of the most common classifications that are currently in use today. Depressants are substances like alcohol and opioids. Stimulants are substances like cocaine and methamphetamines. Both of these categories can produce overdose and death. Also, both are initially taken as recreational drugs. Dependence and abuse of drugs usually follow after a couple of uses.

Alcohol and opioids are nervous system depressants. This means that they slow down the body and mind. Those who take this type of drug are likely high strung and anxious. They are, in essence, self-medicating. These individuals would likely do well in therapy or through controlled drug prescriptions. They are often unwilling to admit that they have any type of problem that needs treatment and continue to use drugs as a means of “recreation” when; in fact, they are medicating away depression and anxiety.

Drugs like cocaine and methamphetamines are usually taken by those who want to be more hyper-aroused. These are the individuals who need a pick-me-up. Often, individuals who have taken a depressant begin to feel like they want to be active. They then take a stimulant in order to neutralize. This can send these users into a spiral of ups and downs that eventually shuts down various parts of the body causing severe permanent damage.

If addiction to any of these substances is not resolved, individuals will often lose friends, jobs, and money. Addicts will spend every last dollar that they have in order to score their next drug. This is because the mind feels as though it is dying if an individual ceases use of a drug. They will steal from friends and family in order to purchase more of whatever drug they have become addicted to. They will often avoid going into work. Many addicts desire their first high all over again. This is almost impossible. The body begins to build up a tolerance to any drug and the effects begin to deteriorate. The only way to get close to the initial high is to take more of the drug. This often doesn’t work quite well and only causes more of a chance of overdose and death.

In conclusion, quitting is a frightening idea for most addicts. For example, if an alcoholic tries to stop drinking cold turkey, they will likely have a close call with death. Alcohol has the most severe withdrawal of all drugs. If an individual takes cocaine for an extended period of time, they can damage the inside tissue of their nose and, at worst, cause cartilage to completely collapse. Quitting often means that they have to use their sober mind to sort out the consequences of what they have done to their bodies.